Maxillofacial prosthetic treatment factors affecting oral health-related quality of life after surgery for patients with oral cancer

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Abstract

Statement of problem:

After oral cancer surgery, tissue defects can cause deformity and limited mobility, complicating many essential functions. For patients with mandibular, tongue, and oral floor defects, evidence regarding the effects of maxillofacial prosthetics on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is lacking. Therefore, maxillofacial prosthetic reconstruction has been implemented with no clear treatment goals.

Purpose:

The purpose of this clinical study was to identify factors affecting the improvement of OHRQoL by using maxillofacial prosthetic treatment after surgery to repair maxillary, mandibular, tongue, and oral floor defects.

Material and methods:

All individuals who agreed to maxillofacial prosthetics after surgery for oral cancer were enrolled. Oral function and OHRQoL were evaluated before maxillofacial prosthesis placement and 1 month after final adjustments. The oral functions evaluated included masticatory function, swallowing function, and articulatory function. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J54) was used to evaluate OHRQoL. Factors affecting changes in the OHIP-J54 score for participants’ background and oral functions before and after treatment were analyzed through logistic regression analysis (stepwise method).

Results:

Participants included 34 men and 16 women with an average age of 72.4 ±8.7 years. “Psychological discomfort” was correlated with the patient's sex and masticatory function. “Physical disability” was related to articulatory function. “Handicap” was related to the swallowing function. “Additional Japanese questions” were related to the patient's sex.

Conclusions:

Participants’ sex and their oral functions, including masticatory, swallowing, and articulatory functions, were associated with improved OHRQoL because of maxillofacial prosthetics after surgery for oral cancer.

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