Effect of tooth substrate and porcelain thickness on porcelain veneer failure loads in vitro

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Abstract

Statement of problem.

Bonded porcelain veneers are widely used esthetic restorations. High success and survival rates have been reported, but failures do occur. Fractures are the commonest failure mode. Minimally invasive or thin veneers have gained popularity. Increased enamel and porcelain thickness improve the strength of veneers bonded to enamel, but less is known about dentin or mixed substrates.

Purpose.

The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the influences of tooth substrate type (all-enamel, all-dentin, or half-dentin-half-enamel) and veneer thickness on the loads needed to cause initial and catastrophic porcelain veneer failure.

Material and methods.

Model discoid porcelain veneer specimens of varying thicknesses were bonded to the flattened facial surfaces of incisors with different enamel and dentin tooth substrates, artificially aged, and loaded to failure with a small sphere. Initial and catastrophic fracture events were identified and analyzed statistically and fractographically.

Results.

Fracture events included initial Hertzian cracks, intermediate radial cracks, and catastrophic gross failure. All specimens retained some porcelain after catastrophic failure. Cement failure occurred at the cement–porcelain interface not at the cement–tooth interface. Porcelain veneers bonded to enamel were substantially stronger and more damage-tolerant than those bonded to dentin or mixed substrates. Increased porcelain thickness substantially raised the loads to catastrophic failure on enamel substrates but only moderately raised the loads to catastrophic failure on dentin or mixed substrates. The veneers bonded to half-dentin-half-enamel behaved remarkably like those bonded wholly to dentin.

Conclusions.

Porcelain veneers bonded to enamel were substantially stronger and more damage-tolerant than those bonded to dentin or half-enamel-half dentin.

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