Aerosol delivery and safety of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease in young children with cystic fibrosis: A bronchoscopic study

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the delivery to the lungs and the short-term safety of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase, Pulmozyme) in children with cystic fibrosis younger than 5 years of age compared with older children. Patients between the ages of 3 months and 10 years had bronchoscopic examination with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after administration of an aerosol dose of 2.5 mg of rhDNase. After recovery from the procedure, patients were discharged home for an additional 13 days of rhDNase therapy. During this time adverse events were recorded to assess short-term safety. A total of 98 patients were enrolled, 65 (66%) aged 3 months to 5 years and 33 (34%) aged 5 years to 10 years. Deoxyribonuclease concentrations in BAL fluid were variable (interquartile range, 752 to 3943 micro g/mL epithelial lining fluid [ELF]) and did not depend on patient age, weight, or height or differ when delivered through a mouthpiece or mask. The median value for the BAL DNA concentration in the younger group was 432 micro g/mL ELF compared with 703 micro g/mL ELF in the older patients. This study demonstrates the value of bronchoscopy and BAL for assessing nebulized medication delivery in young children and shows that aerosolized medications can be delivered to and are present in comparable amounts in the lower airways of younger and older children. Exposure to rhDNase appears to be safe over 2 weeks in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis. (J Pediatr 1998;133:486-91)

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