Lack of Inhibitory Effect of Octreotide on Intestinal Adaptation in Short Bowel Syndrome in the Rat

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Abstract

Background:

Octreotide is a long-acting analogue of somatostatin, which is effective in the treatment of secretory diarrhea in a number of disorders including short bowel syndrome. Its use in this syndrome has been limited because of concerns about potential adverse effect on intestinal adaptation, because it inhibits a number of trophic hormones. This study was conducted to determine whether octreotide inhibits intestinal adaptation in a rat model of short bowel syndrome.

Methods:

Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four treatment groups, eight receiving 80% small-bowel resection and treated with 2.25μg/kg-1 per day-1 of octreotide, eight receiving 80% small-bowel resection and treated with 25 μg/kg-1 per day-1 of octreotide, eight receiving 80% small-bowel resection with saline control, and six receiving sham operation with saline control. Mucosal weight, protein, and sucrase levels were subsequently analyzed after 2 weeks of therapy.

Results:

Massive adaptation occurred in all three groups relative to sham-operated controls. However, neither the pharmacologic nor the much higher dose of octreotide demonstrated any adverse effects on intestinal adaptation.

Conclusion:

In our animal model, octreotide does not inhibit intestinal adaptation after massive small-bowel resection.

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