Patient Satisfaction of Pharmacist-Provided Care via Clinical Video Teleconferencing

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:

Patient satisfaction with the use of telehealth in disease state management provided by pharmacists has not been fully studied. We hypothesized that patient satisfaction with pharmacist-provided consultations via clinical video teleconferencing (CVT) would not differ from face-to-face delivery.

Methods:

Patients were recruited from 2 primary care provider sites from September 2015 to May 2016. Patients completed a survey to evaluate their satisfaction and quality of provider–patient communication with the method in which consultation with a pharmacist was provided. The survey was a 10-item, patient self-reported questionnaire. The primary outcome evaluated patients’ scores on assessment of the provider’s use of patient-centered communication. The secondary outcome evaluated patients’ scores on assessment of the provider’s clinical competence and skills and interpersonal skills.

Results:

There were a total of 57 surveys collected. For both the primary outcome and secondary outcome, over 80% of collected responses for each question in both clinics were scored a 5 that indicates patients were very satisfied with the provider’s use of patient-centered communication and clinical competence and skills. For both the primary and secondary outcomes, there were no statistically significant differences in patients’ scores that assessed provider’s use of patient-centered communication nor the provider’s clinical competence and skill.

Conclusion:

The results of this study indicate patients are satisfied with pharmacists’ use of patient-centered communication and clinical competence and skills via both CVT and face-to-face consultations supporting our research hypothesis that patient satisfaction with care provided via CVT did not differ from face-to-face provided care.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles