MAXIMAL ECCENTRIC AND CONCENTRIC STRENGTH DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN FOR DYNAMIC RESISTANCE EXERCISE

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Although research has demonstrated that isokinetic eccentric (ECC) strength is 20–60% greater than isokinetic concentric (CON) strength, few data exist comparing these strength differences in standard dynamic resistance exercises. The purpose of the study was to determine the difference in maximal dynamic ECC and CON strength for 6 different resistance exercises in young men and women. Ten healthy young men (mean ± SE, 25.30 ± 1.34 years), and 10 healthy young women (mean ± SE, 23.40 ± 1.37 years) who were regular exercisers with resistance training experience participated in the study. Two sessions were performed to determine CON and ECC 1 repetitions maximum for latissimus pull-down (LTP), leg press (LP), bench press (BP), leg extension (LE), seated military press (MP), and leg curl (LC) exercises. Maximal ECC and maximal CON strength were determined on weight stack machines modified to isolate ECC and CON contractions using steel bars and pulleys such that only 1 type of contraction was performed. Within 2 weeks, participants returned and completed a retest trial in a counterbalanced fashioned. Test-retest reliability was excellent (r = 0.99) for all resistance exercise trials. Men demonstrated 20–60% greater ECC than CON strength (LTP = 32%, LP = 44%, BP = 40%, LE = 35%, MP = 49%, LC = 27%). Women's strength exceeded the proposed parameters for greater ECC strength in 4 exercises, p < 0.05 (LP = 66%, BP = 146%, MP = 161%, LC = 82%). The ECC/CON assessment could help coaches capitalize on muscle strength differences in young men and women during training to aid in program design and injury prevention and to enhance strength development.

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