Effect of Training Status on Reliability of One Repetition Maximum Testing in Women

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Abstract

Benton, MJ, Raab, S, and Waggener, GT. Effect of training status on reliability of one repetition maximum testing in women. J Strength Cond Res 27(7): 1885–1890, 2013—In untrained adults, multiple trials of maximal strength testing are necessary to obtain reliable measures. Training status may positively influence test-retest reliability and increase testing efficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training status on differences between trials of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) measurement in women. Before (untrained women [UTW]) and after (trained women [TRW]) an 8-week resistance training program, 10 women (45.6 ± 1.4 years; body mass index 28.7 ± 1.6 kg·m−2) completed 3 trials of 1RM chest and leg press with at least 24 hours rest between trials. In UTW, differences between chest press trials were nonsignificant (trials 1–2: 2.36 ± 1.39 kg, p = 0.37; trials 2–3: 0.82 ± 0.77 kg, p = 0.95; trials 1–3: 3.18 ± 0.16 kg, p = 0.07), although a significant difference between leg press trials 1–3 was observed (trials 1–2: 6.55 ± 3.31 kg, p = 0.25; trials 2–3: 2.52 ± 1.1 kg, p = 0.15; trials 1–3: 9.07 ± 2.83 kg, p = 0.04). In TRW, differences between all 1RM trials were nonsignificant for both the chest press (trials 1–2: −0.65 ± 2.11 kg, p = 1.0; trials 2–3: 1.62 ± 0.69 kg, p = 0.15; trials 1–3: 0.96 ± 2.07 kg, p = 1.0) and leg press (trials 1–2: −1.51 ± 2.13 kg, p = 1.0; trials 2–3: 3.53 ± 3.0 kg, p = 0.82; trials 1–3: 2.01 ± 3.87 kg, p = 1.0). Our results suggest that training status has a positive influence on the efficiency of maximal strength measurement. For trained middle-aged women, a single trial of 1RM chest or leg press may be sufficient to obtain an accurate and reliable measure of maximal strength.

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