Skin Reduction Technique for Correction of Lateral Deviation of the Erect Straight Penis

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Abstract

Introduction.

Lateral deviation of the erect straight penis (LDESP) refers to a penis that despite being straight in the erect state, points laterally, yet can be directed forward manually without the use of force. While LDESP should not impose a negative impact on sexual function, it may have a negative cosmetic impact.

Aim.

This work describes skin reduction technique (SRT) for correction of LDESP.

Methods.

Counseling was offered to males with LDESP after excluding other abnormalities. Surgery was performed in case of failed counseling. In the erect state, the degree and direction of LDESP were noted. Skin on the base of the penis on the contralateral side of LDESP was excised from the base of the penis and the edges approximated to correct LDESP. Further excision was repeated if needed. The incision was closed in two layers.

Main Outcome Measure.

Long-term efficacy of SRT was the main outcome measure.

Results.

Out of 183 males with LDESP, 66.7% were not sexually active. Counseling relieved 91.8% of cases. Fifteen patients insisted on surgery, mostly from among the sexually active where the complaint was mutual from the patient and partner. SRT resulted in full correction of the angle of erection in 12 cases out of 15. Two had minimal recurrence, and one had major recurrence indicating re-SRT.

Conclusions.

LDESP is more common a complaint among those who have not experienced coital relationship, and is mostly relieved by counseling. However, sexually active males with this complaint are more difficult to relieve by counseling. A minority of patients may opt for surgical correction. SRT achieves a forward erection in such patients, is minimally invasive, and relatively safe, provided the angle of erection can be corrected manually without force. Shaeer O. Skin reduction technique for correction of lateral deviation of the erect straight penis. J Sex Med 2014;11:1863–1866.

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