ADDITION OF A MAST CELL STABILIZING COMPOUND TO ORGAN PRESERVATION SOLUTIONS DECREASES LUNG REPERFUSION INJURY

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Abstract

Objective:

Research in lung transplant preservation has generally focused on free radicals and enzyme release from neutrophils, parenchymal cells, macrophages, and endothelium. The lung has a large resident population of mast cells that, when activated, release potent inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that adding an inhibitor of mast cell degranulation, lodoxamide tromethamine (10 μmol/L), to Euro-Collins and University of Wisconsin preservation solutions, would decrease lung preservation injury.

Methods:

Rat lungs were isolated, flushed with the respective solution, and stored at 4° C for 6 or 12 hours. The lungs were reperfused with fresh blood and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, oxygen tension, capillary filtration coefficient, and compliance were determined.

Results:

After 6 hours of ischemic storage: lodoxamide tromethamine-enhanced Euro-Collins solution decreased alveolar-arterial oxygen difference from 539 to 457 (p = 0.004), increased oxygen tension from 119 to 205 mm Hg (p = 0.006), and decreased capillary filtration coefficient from 3.9 to 2.0 (p < 0.001); lodoxamide tromethamine-enhanced University of Wisconsin solution decreased alveolar-arterial oxygen difference from 546 to 317 (p < 0.001), increased oxygen tension from 166 to 335 mm Hg (p < 0.001), and decreased capillary filtration coefficient from 3.0 to 1.7 (p < 0.001). After 12 hours of ischemic storage, lodoxamide tromethamine-enhanced Euro-Collins solution decreased alveolar-arterial oxygen difference from 588 to 485 (p < 0.001), increased oxygen tension from 100 to 161 mm Hg (p = 0.012), decreased capillary filtration coefficient from 6.2 to 2.6 (p < 0.001), and increased compliance from 0.12 to 0.21 (p < 0.001); lodoxamide tromethamine-enhanced University of Wisconsin solution decreased alveolar-arterial oxygen difference from 478 to 322 (p < 0.001), increased oxygen tension from 214 to 335 mm Hg (p < 0.001), decreased capillary filtration constant from 4.2 to 2.0 (p < 0.001), and increased compliance from 0.20 to 0.25 (p < 0.001).

Conclusions:

Addition of lodoxamide tromethamine to Euro-Collins or University of Wisconsin solution results in a marked decrease in lung reperfusion injury as demonstrated by increased oxygenation, decreased microvascular permeability, and increased compliance. These results are relevant as Euro-Collins and University of Wisconsin solutions are the most common clinically used lung preservation solutions. This study also highlights the deleterious role of resident mast cells in preservation injury.

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