Impact of cardiac arrest resuscitated donors on heart transplant recipients' outcome

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Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the influence of cardiac arrest−resuscitated donors (CARDs) on the outcome of heart recipients.

Methods:

Patients transplanted between July 2004 and December 2012 were divided into 2 groups according to the history of cardiac arrest in donors and their clinical records were retrospectively reviewed.

Results:

A total of 584 heart transplantations were performed during the study period, and 117 recipients received an organ from a CARD. There were no differences between the 2 groups with regards to recipient age, sex, cardiomyopathy, preoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, national high emergency waiting list, and redo surgery. Donors who sustained a cardiac arrest were significantly younger (44 [32-51] vs 49 [41-56] years; P < .001), their main cause of death was anoxia (57% vs 1%; P < .001), and they had significantly greater troponin T peak levels (0.51 [0.128-3.108] vs 0.11 [0.04-0.43] ng/mL; P < .001). Median cardiac arrest duration was 15 minutes (5-25). No difference was noted in donors with regards to left ventricular ejection fraction at time of organ procurement (62% ± 8% vs 63% ± 8%; P = .2). There were no differences between the 2 groups with regards to ischemic time (179 ± 60 vs 183 ± 59 minutes; P = .43), need for postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for primary graft failure (31% vs 30%; P = .993) and 30-days mortality. Recipients receiving an organ from a CARD had a significantly better 10 year survival (69.4% vs 50.4%; P = .017).

Conclusions:

History of cardiac arrest in donors with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction at time of organ procurement doesn't affect outcome of heart recipients.

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