Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Thorax Using 2-Dimensional Balanced Subsecond Steady-state Free Precession Sequence During Forced Breathing in Comparison With Spirometry

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Abstract

Purpose:

The purpose of this article was to investigate the feasibility of kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during forced breathing for the assessment of thoracic and diaphragmatic movement and to compare the results of MRI and spirometry to determine the MRI parameters that are predominantly associated with pulmonary function.

Materials and Methods:

Forty-nine healthy volunteers who underwent kinematic MRI using 2-dimensional balanced subsecond steady-state free precession sequence during forced breathing were included. Several items on the MRI were measured and calculated: these were anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the thorax, APD1, ΔAPD, and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the lung field. The results were compared with the results of spirometry.

Results:

In the comparison between the spirometry results and the MRI kinematic changes, CSA1, ΔCSA, and CSA1% were most significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (right: P<0.001, r=0.814; left: P<0.001, r=0.759); vital capacity (right: P<0.001, r=0.797; left: P<0.001, r=0.780); and forced expiratory volume% in 1 second (right: P<0.001, r=0.530; left: P<0.001, r=0.518), respectively. The APD1 values in the upper position were significantly larger than those in the middle (right: P<0.001; left: P<0.001) and lower (right: P<0.001; left: P<0.001) positions. The ΔAPD values in the upper position were also significantly larger than those in the middle (right: P<0.001; left: P<0.001) and lower (right: P<0.001; left: P<0.001) positions.

Conclusion:

Kinematic MRI with 2-dimensional balanced subsecond steady-state free precession can be used to assess thoracic and diaphragmatic movement during forced breathing. The dynamic changes in CSA correlated well with the results of spirometry.

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