Prognostic significance of tricuspid annular displacement in normotensive patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism

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Abstract

Background:

Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) is an emerging prognostic indicator in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE).

Methods and Results:

We prospectively examined 782 normotensive patients with PE who underwent echocardiography in a multicenter study. As compared with patients with a TAPSE of > 1.6 cm, those with a TAPSE of ≤ 1.6 cm had increased systolic pulmonary artery pressure (53.7 ± 16.7 mmHg vs. 40.0 ± 15.5 mmHg, P < 0.001), right ventricle (RV) end-diastolic diameter (3.5 ± 0.8 cm vs. 3.0 ± 0.6 cm, P < 0.001), and RV to left ventricle end-diastolic diameter ratio (1.0 ± 0.3 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2, P < 0.001), and a higher prevalence of RV free wall hypokinesis (68% vs. 11%, P < 0.001). Patients with a TAPSE of ≤ 1.6 cm at the time of PE diagnosis were significantly more likely to die from any cause (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–4.7; P = 0.02) and from PE (HR 4.4; 95% CI 1.3–15.3; P = 0.02) during follow-up. In an external validation cohort of 1326 patients with acute PE enrolled in the international multicenter Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbólica, a TAPSE of ≤ 1.6 cm remained a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR 2.1; 95% CI 1.3–3.2; P = 0.001) and PE-specific mortality (HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2–5.2; P = 0.01).

Conclusions:

In normotensive patients with PE, TAPSE reflects right ventricular function. For these patients, TAPSE is independently predictive of survival.

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