HYPERNATRIURIA AND KALIURESIS IN ENURETIC CHILDREN AND THE DIURNAL VARIATION

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Abstract

Purpose

We investigate the underlying pathophysiological cause of primary nocturnal enuresis by comparing electrolyte alterations in urine samples of enuretics during the daytime and nighttime compared with those of nonenuretic subjects.

Materials and Methods

Urine output, urine specific gravity and urinary electrolytes in 15 enuretic and 12 nonenuretic children were measured. We collected daytime serum and urine samples of children fed a similar diet between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., and nighttime between samples 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. Urinary calcium/creatinine ratio, tubular reabsorption of phosphorus and excretions of fractional sodium and potassium were calculated.

Results

There was no significant difference between the calcium/creatinine ratio ratios. There was a significant increase in fractional sodium and fractional potassium values in enuretics compared to nonenuretics during the day and at night. Daytime and nighttime fractional sodium and fractional potassium values in enuretics were similar. In contrast to nonenuretics, enuretic patients had no diurnal variation of fractional sodium. There was significant positive correlation between bedwetting status, and fractional sodium and fractional potassium.

Conclusions

Since sodium and potassium excretions were higher in enuretic patients than nonenuretic children, and no significant diurnal variation in urinary excretion of these ions there might be a difference in the mechanism of reabsorption of sodium and potassium between enuretic and nonenuretic children.

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