RENAL AUTOTRANSPLANTATION FOR THE LOIN PAIN-HEMATURIA SYNDROME: LONG-TERM FOLLOWUP OF 26 CASES

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Abstract

Purpose

We review the long-term results of renal autotransplantation as a form of nephron sparing renal denervation for patients with the loin pain-hematuria syndrome.

Materials and Methods

From 1985 to 1997, after exclusion of other urological, nephrological and psychiatric causes for severe intractable flank pain and recurrent hematuria, 22 patients with severe debility and heavy narcotic dependency underwent 26 renal autotransplantations for pain control. Postoperative pain relief, narcotic use, level of function in daily activities and status of the autograft were assessed.

Results

Median and mean followup was 78.5 and 84.7 months (range 30 to 138), respectively. There were 2 technical failures. Pain recurred within 2 years after 6 procedures, of which 3 resulted in transplant nephrectomy and 3 were managed with a reduced analgesic requirement. Of the 16 patients with minimum 5 years of followup 12 (75%) were pain-free after surgery with 3 additional patients pain-free after transplant nephrectomy. Overall, 18 of the 26 autotransplant procedures (69.2%) resulted in pain relief, in some cases beyond 10 years, with patients returning to normal daily activities.

Conclusions

Renal autotransplantation results in durable narcotic-free favorable results in the majority of meticulously screened loin pain-hematuria syndrome patients. Although some failures, which usually occur within 2 years after surgery, can be expected, autotransplantation is justified as a nephron sparing denervation therapy for select loin pain-hematuria syndrome patients.

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