A UNIQUE NEW MODEL TO STUDY THE EFFECTS OF URINARY DIVERSION IN THE DEVELOPING RABBIT BLADDER

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the developmental effects of high urinary diversion and bladder defunctionalization in infancy. Although clinical experience shows that a poorly functional bladder may result from urinary diversion in infancy, the mechanisms of change and specific bladder wall alterations have not been well characterized. We hypothesized that cyclic filling and emptying are necessary for normal bladder development. To investigate this important question we created a new animal model.

Materials and Methods

We designed a new method of hemibladder urinary diversion in 3-week-old New Zealand white rabbits. After vertical midline bladder division half of the bladder was formed into a functional reservoir, which remained in continuity with the ipsilateral ureter and urethra. The other bladder half was defunctionalized and isolated from the urine flow by ureteral ligation. Diversion was created for 3, 7, 14 and 28 days. Urodynamic evaluation was done in the functionalized hemibladders and age matched normal rabbit bladders to test the validity of the functionalized hemibladder as an internal control. Functional and defunctionalized hemibladders as well as age matched, nonoperated normal rabbit bladders were weighed, sectioned and stained to demonstrate muscle and connective tissue components.

Results

In 22 of the 27 healthy rabbits (81%) good quality diverted and functional bladder specimens were obtained after diversion. Defunctionalized hemibladders grew more slowly than functionalized bladders and normal age matched control bladders. Histological staining of the bladder wall demonstrated increased connective tissue between the muscle bundles within the diverted specimens than in functional bladders.

Conclusions

Our successful model of urinary diversion may be used to study the developmental and histological effects of urinary diversion in the young bladder. Bladder growth and histological appearance are altered when the stimulus of cyclic filling and emptying is removed. Further studies using this model are warranted to define fully bladder changes that result from diversion and investigate the mechanism of the observed changes.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles