Preprocedural neutrophil count predicts outcome in patients with advanced peripheral vascular disease undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

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Abstract

Background:

The neutrophil count has been associated with adverse cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention. There are limited data on risk stratification of patients with advanced peripheral vascular disease (PVD) using white blood cell (WBC) subtypes. This study assessed the association of total and differential WBC counts with adverse outcome in patients with advanced PVD undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).

Methods:

In a retrospective cohort study, consecutive de novo procedures were analyzed for patients with Rutherford category 4 or 5 PVD who underwent successful nonemergency PTA. Cardiovascular risk factors, baseline total and differential WBC counts, and angiographic data were recorded. Primary outcome was a composite of events of target vessel revascularization (repeat PTA or vascular bypass operation) or lower limb amputation.

Results:

A total of 101 patients were studied. Their mean age was 76 ± 10 years, 54% had diabetes mellitus, 68% were hypertensive, and 12% had had previous myocardial infarction. We observed 29 events during a median period of 14 months (interquartile range, 4-26). Cox regression analysis found diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 4.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-16.14;P= .02), Rutherford category 5 (OR, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.06-16.51;P= .04), poor tibial runoff (OR, 4.42; 95% CI, 1.16-16.82;P= .03), and preprocedural neutrophil count in the third tertile (OR, 10.77; 95% CI, 2.19-52.91;P= .003) were independent predictors of outcome.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that the preprocedural neutrophil count could be used in global risk factor assessment of patients with advanced PVD who are being considered for PTA. The neutrophil count may reflect the burden of atherosclerosis and tissue damage, and so could identify patients who need more aggressive intervention for advanced PVD.

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