Anatomic severity grading score for primary descending thoracic aneurysms predicts procedural difficulty and aortic-related reinterventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

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Abstract

Background:

An anatomic severity grading (ASG) score for primary descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAs) was developed. The objective of this study was to determine if an ASG score cutoff value for DTAs is predictive of procedural complexity, aortic-related reinterventions, and mortality in patients who undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR).

Methods:

A retrospective review from 2008 to 2013 of patient records was conducted of all consecutive patients who underwent TEVAR for a primary DTA. A comprehensive scoring system of preoperative DTA morphology on the basis of computed tomography angiography images was established to identify and classify anatomic features that might influence outcome after TEVAR. ASG score calculations were achieved using preoperative computed tomography angiography images. Primary outcomes included primary technical success, aortic-related reinterventions, aneurysm-related mortality, and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included procedural complexity (unplanned adjunctive procedures, number of endografts implanted, contrast volume, and procedure time), endoleak formation, endoleak requiring reintervention, stroke and paraplegia, and conversion to open repair.

Results:

Of 469 patients with a diagnosis of a thoracic aortic aneurysm, 62 patients (13%) underwent TEVAR and had adequate preoperative imaging (mean age, 71 years). Applying the ASG score, we identified 39 patients (63%) with a score ≥24 (high-score group) and 23 patients (37%) with a score <24 (low-score group). Mean follow-up was 15.3 months (range, 4 days to 3.7 years; standard deviation, 1 year) for both groups. Freedom from all-cause mortality was significantly different in the high-score (87% at 1 year, 79% at 2 years, and 57% at 3 years) vs the low-score group (100% at 1, 2, and 3-years; log-rank test,P< .021). There was no significant difference between mortality in the high-score (97% at 1 year, 87% at 2 years, and 69% at 3 years) compared with the low-score group (100% at 1, 2, and 3 years; log-rank test,P= .162). Freedom from aortic-related reinterventions was significantly lower in the high-score (82% at 1 year, 68% at 2 years, and 35% at 3 years) compared with the low-score group (100% at 1, 2, and 3 years; log-rank test,P= .002). Operative difficulty in the form of intraoperative adjunct procedures, number of endografts implanted, and procedural time had significant differences between groups (18% vs 0%,P= .038; 79% vs 39%,P= .004; 120 vs 79 minutes,P= .005, respectively). No significant difference in 30-day combined stroke and paraplegia (16%) was present between groups, and no patient had a conversion to open repair during the follow-up period.

Conclusions:

Preoperative ASG score for primary DTAs predicted procedure complexity and aortic-related reinterventions after TEVAR.

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