Satisfactory short-term outcomes of the STABILISE technique for type B aortic dissection

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Abstract

Objective:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the perioperative and short-term results in a cohort of patients treated during the last year at our institution with the stent-assisted balloon-induced intimal disruption and relamination in aortic dissection repair (STABILISE) technique for acute complicated aortic dissection.

Methods:

Between June 2016 and June 2017, 10 patients (all male; mean age, 62.6 ± 7.4 years) received treatment for acute complicated aortic dissection with the STABILISE technique. After a standard provisional extension to induce complete attachment procedure using the commercially available endovascular dissection system (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), the distal stent graft area and the bare stent area were ballooned to completely exclude the thoracic false lumen (FL) and to obtain a single-channeled abdominal aorta. Computed tomography was routinely performed within the first postoperative week before discharge and then at 3 months, at 6 months, and yearly thereafter. The technical and clinical success rates were analyzed.

Results:

The 30-day technical and clinical success rates were 100%, with complete thrombosis of the thoracic FL and no type I endoleak. Malperfusion was resolved in all cases. No aortic ruptures were recorded, and no open conversion was required. One case of delayed spinal cord ischemia fully resolved within the discharge period. Predischarge computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the thoracic FL in all cases. In two cases, some degree of patency of the abdominal FL was observed. At short-term follow-up, the overall aortic diameters remained stable with no further dilation.

Conclusions:

The STABILISE technique was safe and feasible in this cohort of patients, with complete thrombosis of the thoracic FL and creation of a single-channeled aorta in most cases. Further studies are needed to ascertain the long-term behavior of the treated aorta.

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