Short- and Long-term Results of Stapedectomy In Children

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Abstract

Studies have indicated that stapedectomy can be an effective procedure in children for correcting conductive hearing losses due to juvenile otosclerosis. However, because childhood otosclerosis is rare and children commonly choose to use hearing aids in lieu of undergoing surgery, little outcome data are available. The purpose of this retrospective study was to provide additional outcome data in both the short and the long term. Stapedectomies were performed on 47 children. Preoperative hearing results were compared with 6-month postoperative hearing results. Hearing results for the children who had long-term follow-up (5 years or more) were compared with the 6-month postoperative results. Stapedectomy was successful (postoperative air conduction pure-tone average [PTA] within 10 dB of the preoperative bone conduction PTA) in 91.7% of the cases. The mean over-closure of the preoperative bone conduction PTA by the postoperative air conduction PTA was 0.2 dB. The mean PTA hearing improvement was 32.8 dB. Results from the 21 children (28 ears) who had long-term follow-up indicated an average 0.7 dB/year PTA worsening from the 6-month postoperative PTA. Results from this study provide additional evidence that stapedectomy can be an effective procedure for correcting conductive hearing losses due to juvenile otosclerosis.

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