Isolation and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from calves and lambs with diarrhoea in India


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Abstract

AimsTo determine the prevalence and molecular characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) in calves and lambs with diarrhoea in India.Methods and ResultsFaecal samples originating from 391 calves and 101 lambs which had diarrhoea were screened for presence of E. coli. A total number of 309 (249 bovine and 60 ovine) E. coli strains were isolated. A total of 113 bovine and 15 ovine strains were subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) for detection of stx1, stx2, eaeA and EHEC hlyA genes. STEC and EPEC belonging to different serogpoups were detected in 9·73% of calves studied. Six per cent and 26·66% of lambs studied were carrying STEC and EPEC, respectively. Majority of the STEC serogroups isolated in this study did not belong to those which have been identified earlier to be associated mainly with diarrhoea and enteritis in cattle and sheep outside India. The most frequent serogroup among bovine and ovine EPEC was O26 (40%). One of the most important STEC serogroup O157, known for certain life-threatening infections in humans, was isolated from both bovine and ovine faecal samples.ConclusionsA high percentage of STEC and EPEC belonging to different serogroups are prevalent in calves and lambs with diarrhoea in India and could be the cause of disease in them.Significance and Impact of the StudyThe study reports, for the first time, the isolation and characterization of STEC and EPEC serogroups associated with diarrhoea in calves and lambs in India. Many STEC and EPEC strains belonged to serogoups known for certain life-threatening diseases in humans.

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