Antibacterial effect of coffee: calcium concentration in a culture containing teeth/biofilm exposed toCoffea Canephoraaqueous extract


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Abstract

This study determined the changes of calcium concentration in a medium containing teeth/biofilm exposed to Coffea canephora extract (CCE). Enamel fragments were randomly fixed into two 24-well polystyrene plates containing BHI. Pooled human saliva was added to form biofilm on fragments. Specimens were divided into treatment groups (G, n = 8 per group) and treated with 50 μl daily for 1 min per week, as follows: G1, 20% CCE; G2, Milli-Q water (negative control); G3, antibiotic (positive control). Six fragments represented the blank control (G4). The calcium content was observed at baseline, 4 and 7 days of treatment by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. Cross-sectional hardness of enamel was a demineralization indicator. Calcium increased in the medium after 4 and 7 days of treatment in G1 (3·80 ± 1·3 mg l−1 and 4·93 ± 2·1 mg l−1, respectively) and G3 (4th day = 5·7 ± 1·8 mg l−1; 7th day = 6·7 ± 3·5 mg l−1) (P > 0·05). Calcium from G2 decreased after 7 days, which was different from G3 (P < 0·05). The lower calcium content, at the end of the experiment, was represented by G4, 2·16 ± 0·2 mg l−1. The increase in calcium after treatment with CCE is probably due to its antibacterial effect, which caused the bacterial lysis and consequent release of calcium in the medium.Significance and Impact of the Study:This study revealed an inhibitory action of Coffea canephora against dental biofilm. This coffee species caused bacterial lysis and consequent release of calcium into the medium. Furthermore, the advantage of coffee as an antibacterial beverage is that it is consumed in a concentrated form (6–10%) as opposed to various medicinal infusions that have shown such effect in vitro and are usually consumed at 1–2%. Therefore, a light roasted C. canephora aqueous extract can be considered as a potential anticariogenic substance.Significance and Impact of the Study: This study revealed an inhibitory action of Coffea canephora against dental biofilm. This coffee species caused bacterial lysis and consequent release of calcium into the medium. Furthermore, the advantage of coffee as an antibacterial beverage is that it is consumed in a concentrated form (6–10%) as opposed to various medicinal infusions that have shown such effect in vitro and are usually consumed at 1–2%. Therefore, a light roasted C. canephora aqueous extract can be considered as a potential anticariogenic substance.

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