Comparing temperature effects onEscherichia coli,Salmonella, andEnterococcussurvival in surface waters


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Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare dependency of survival rates on temperature for indicator organisms Escherichia coli and Enterococcus and the pathogen Salmonella in surface waters. A database of 86 survival datasets from peer-reviewed papers on inactivation of E. coli, Salmonella and Enterococcus in marine waters and of E. coli and Salmonella in lake waters was assembled. The Q10 model was used to express temperature effect on survival rates obtained from linear sections of semi-logarithmic survival graphs. Available data were insufficient to establish differences in survival rates and temperature dependencies for marine waters where values of Q10 = 3 and a survival rate of 0·7 day−1 could be applied. The Q10 values in lake waters were substantially lower in marine waters, and Salmonella inactivation in lake water was, on average, twice as fast as E. coli; data on E. coli substantially outnumber data on Enterococcus and Salmonella. The relative increase in inactivation with increase in temperature is higher in marine waters than lake water, and differences in inactivation between Salmonella and E. coli at a given temperature were significant in lake water but not in marine waters.Significance and Impact of the Study:Microbiological quality of surface waters is of paramount importance for public health. The novelty of this work is using a large compendium of published data to develop the first comparison of temperature effects on survival of the pathogen Salmonella and water quality indicator micro-organisms Escherichia coli and Enterococcus in natural waters. The existing relatively large body of knowledge on E. coli survival appears to be useful to assess the effect of temperature on survival of Salmonella. Moreover, results of this work constitute an essential input in models to support environmental management decisions on the use of surface water sources in agriculture, aquaculture and recreation.Significance and Impact of the Study: Microbiological quality of surface waters is of paramount importance for public health. The novelty of this work is using a large compendium of published data to develop the first comparison of temperature effects on survival of the pathogen Salmonella and water quality indicator micro-organisms Escherichia coli and Enterococcus in natural waters. The existing relatively large body of knowledge on E. coli survival appears to be useful to assess the effect of temperature on survival of Salmonella. Moreover, results of this work constitute an essential input in models to support environmental management decisions on the use of surface water sources in agriculture, aquaculture and recreation.

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