Synergistic sporicidal effect of ethanol on a combination of orthophthalaldehyde and Didecyldimethylammonium chloride


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of ethanol on a combination of orthophthalaldehyde (OPA) and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) against the spores of Bacillus subtilis var. Niger. The quantitative carrier test for sporicidal testing of high-level disinfectants according to the guideline of China (Technical Standard for Disinfection 2002) was used as method. Considerable synergistic effect was observed after a 30-min treatment at 20°C. There was an augment in mean log reduction as the concentration of DDAC was increased ranging from 0·2 to 3 g l−1 in combination with 6 g l−1 OPA. Ten and 20% ethanol in combination with 6 g l−1 OPA and 2 g l−1 DDAC caused more than a 3-log reduction while either 6 g l−1 OPA, 2 g l−1 DDAC and 20% ethanol alone or a combination of two of the three agents produced less than a 1-log reduction. Further, 40-min exposure time of combination of OPA, DDAC and 20% ethanol led to greater than a 5-log reduction in spores, and no spore growth was observed following 60- and 90-min exposures.Significance and Impact of the Study:Orthophthalaldehyde (OPA) is very effective at concentrations far lower than its recommended in-use concentration of 0·5% (w/v) and is equally effective against both the gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, it shows lower activity against spores. The synergistic sporicidal effect exhibited by ethanol on a combination of OPA and DDAC can be considered to enhance sporicidal activity for using in situations of sterilization, to reduce in-use concentration of OPA used alone, which may minimize its side effect. OPA may be a more satisfactory and the first-choice agent to replace glutaraldehyde (GTA) as a high-level disinfectant for medical devices.Significance and Impact of the Study: Orthophthalaldehyde (OPA) is very effective at concentrations far lower than its recommended in-use concentration of 0·5% (w/v) and is equally effective against both the gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, it shows lower activity against spores. The synergistic sporicidal effect exhibited by ethanol on a combination of OPA and DDAC can be considered to enhance sporicidal activity for using in situations of sterilization, to reduce in-use concentration of OPA used alone, which may minimize its side effect. OPA may be a more satisfactory and the first-choice agent to replace glutaraldehyde (GTA) as a high-level disinfectant for medical devices.

    loading  Loading Related Articles