Antifungal effect of 405-nm light onBotrytis cinerea


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Abstract

There is very little information on the fungistatic or fungicidal effect of visible light. This study investigated the effect of 405-nm light, generated by a light-emitting diode array, on the economically important fungus Botrytis cinerea. The mycelial growth of B. cinerea was inhibited to the greatest extent by light at 405 and 415 nm and was negligibly inactivated at 450 nm, suggesting the presence of a photosensitizing compound that absorbs light mainly at wavelengths of 405–415 nm. Delta-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor of endogenous photosensitizer porphyrins, was used to determine the role of these porphyrins in 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of the fungus. Concentration-dependent inhibition of spore germination by delta-aminolevulinic acid and accumulation of singlet oxygen in the spores was observed when the spores were exposed to 405-nm light. These results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen could partially explain the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of B. cinerea. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly reduced by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that 405-nm light has a potential use for controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea.Significance and Impact of the Study:Grey mould (Botrytis cinerea) is a very successful necrotroph, causing serious losses in more than 200 crop hosts. This study investigated the antifungal effect of 405-nm light on this pathogen. Our results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen contribute to the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of grey mould. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly inhibited by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that this wavelength of light has a potential use in controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea.

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