Impact of Human Leukocyte Antigen Mismatching on Outcomes of Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Patient selection criteria of deceased donor liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are almost completely established. The aim of this study was to establish selection criteria for both patients and donors of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) for PBC. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to examine patient and donor characteristics of our first 50 cases of LDLT for PBC to elucidate factors that significantly impacted patient survival or disease recurrence after LDLT in the univariate and/or multivariate analyses. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of persistent ascites before LDLT, a higher number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, and -DR mismatches between donor and recipient, and donor age ≥50 years were factors significantly associated with early posttransplant death. Independent risk factors for PBC recurrence after LDLT were a lower number of HLA mismatches between donor and recipient, and a lower average trough level of tacrolimus within 1 year after LDLT. Specifically, the lower the number of HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches or the average trough level of tacrolimus within 1 year after LDLT, the higher the possibility of developing a recurrence of PBC. In conclusion, the absence of persistent ascites before LDLT, a lower number of HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches between donor and recipient, and a younger donor (<50 years) are preferred for gaining acceptable survival outcomes for the transplant. However, a lower number of HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches between donor and recipient may be a risk factor for PBC recurrence. Liver Transpl, 2006. © 2006 AASLD.

    loading  Loading Related Articles