Improved rat steatotic and nonsteatotic liver preservation by the addition of epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-I to University of Wisconsin solution


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Abstract

This study examined the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) supplementation to University of Wisconsin solution (UW) in steatotic and nonsteatotic livers during cold storage. Hepatic injury and function were evaluated in livers preserved for 24 hours at 4°C in UW and in UW with EGF and IGF-I (separately or in combination) and then perfused ex vivo for 2 hours at 37°C. AKT was inhibited pharmacologically. In addition, hepatic injury and survival were evaluated in recipients who underwent transplantation with steatotic and nonsteatotic livers preserved for 6 hours in UW and UW with EGF and IGF-I (separately or in combination). The results, based on isolated perfused liver, indicated that the addition of EGF and IGF-I (separately or in combination) to UW reduced hepatic injury and improved function in both liver types. A combination of EGF and IGF-I resulted in hepatic injury and function parameters in both liver types similar to those obtained by EGF and IGF-I separately. EGF increased IGF-I, and both additives up-regulated AKT in both liver types. This was associated with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) inhibition in nonsteatotic livers and PPARγ overexpression in steatotic livers. When AKT was inhibited, the effects of EGF and IGF-I on GSK3β, PPARγ, hepatic injury and function disappeared. The benefits of EGF and IGF-I as additives in UW solution were also clearly seen in the liver transplantation model, because the presence of EGF and IGF-I (separately or in combination) in UW solution reduced hepatic injury and improved survival in recipients who underwent transplantation with steatotic and nonsteatotic liver grafts. In conclusion, EGF and IGF-I may constitute new additives to UW solution in steatotic and nonsteatotic liver preservation, whereas a combination of both seems unnecessary. Liver Transpl 16:1098-1111, 2010. © 2010 AASLD.

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