Lactate clearance is associated with mortality in septic patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy: A cohort study

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Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess the clinical utility of lactate measured at different time points to predict mortality at 48 hours and 28 days in septic patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).

Consecutive critically ill patients with septic AKI requiring CRRT were prospectively studied. Variables were collected at initiation of CRRT and 24 hours later.

In total, 186 patients were analyzed. Overall mortality at 48 hours was 28% and at 28 days was 69%. Initial lactate, lactate at 24 hours and the proportion of patients with a lactate clearance superior to 10% were different between survivors at 28 days [2.0 mmol/L, 1.95 mmol/L and 18/45 (40%)] and nonsurvivors [3.46 mmol, 4.66 mmol, and 18/94 (19%)]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lactate at 24 hours and lactate clearance, but not initial lactate, were independently associated to mortality. Area under the ROC curves for 28-day mortality was 0.635 for initial lactate; 0.828 for lactate at 24 hours and 0.701 for lactate clearance.

Lactate clearance and lactate after 24 hours of CRRT, but not initial lactate, were independently associated with mortality in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. Serial lactate measurements may be useful prognostic markers than initial lactate in these patients.

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