Isolated cardiac troponin rise does not modify the prognosis in elderly patients with hip fracture

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Abstract

Perioperative myocardial infarction remains a life-threatening complication in noncardiac surgery and even an isolated troponin rise (ITR) is associated with significant mortality. Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of ITR in elderly patients with hip fracture.

In this cohort study, all patients admitted between 2009 and 2013 in our dedicated geriatric postoperative unit after hip fracture surgery with a cardiac troponin I determination were included and divided into Control, ITR, and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) groups. The primary end point was a composite criteria defined as 6-month mortality and/or re-hospitalization. Secondary end points included 30-day mortality, 6-month mortality, and 6-month functional outcome.

Three hundred twelve patients were (age 85 ± 7 years) divided into Control (n = 217), ITR (n = 50), and ACS (n = 45) groups. There was no significant difference for any postoperative complications between ITR and Control groups. In contrast, atrial fibrillation, acute heart failure, hemorrhage, and ICU admission were significantly more frequent in the ACS group. Compared to the Control group, 6-month mortality and/or rehospitalization was not significantly modified in the ITR group (26% vs. 28%, P = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] of the difference -13%–14%), whereas it was increased in the ACS group (44% vs. 28%, P = 0.02, 95% CI of the difference 2%–32%). ITR was not associated with a higher risk of new institutionalization or impaired walking ability at 6 months, in contrast to ACS group.

In elderly patients with hip fracture, ITR was not associated with a significant increase in death and/or rehospitalization within 6 months.

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