Comparison of clinical outcomes after drug-eluting stent implantation in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients in China: A retrospective study

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Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been proved to be a predictor of adverse outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Drug-eluting stents (DESs) could reduce the adverse events in DM patients. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical outcome after DES implantation in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients in China. Totally, 200 Chinese DM patients and 400 Chinese non-DM patients were enrolled in this retrospective study. Compared with non-DM patients, DM patients were more likely to have a higher incidence of cardiac death (3.5% vs. 1.0%, P = .048), stent thrombosis (2.5% vs. 0.5%, P = .044), target lesion revascularization (6.0% vs. 1.8%, P = .005), target vessel failure (15.5% vs. 8.0%, P < .001), target lesion failure (14.0% vs. 4.3%, P < .001), myocardial infarction (4.5% vs. 1.5%, P = .030), and major adverse cardiac events (12.5% vs. 5.0%, P = .001) at 2-year follow-up. However, the incidence of target vessel revascularization (7.5% vs. 5.5%, P = .340) was similar between DB and non-DB patients. Patients with DB (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.54, P = .001), older than 80 years (HR = 1.33, P = .027) with hypercholesterolemia (HR = 1.03, P < .001), serum creatinine >177 μmol/L (HR = 3.04, P = .011), a history of cerebral vascular accident (HR = 4.29, P = .010), or a history of myocardial infarction (HR = 31.4, P < .001) were more likely to experience adverse events. In China, DM could also be served as an independent predictor of adverse outcomes after DES implantation. These patients should be reexamined more frequently.

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