Skeletal-related events and overall survival of patients with bone metastasis from nonsmall cell lung cancer – A retrospective analysis

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Abstract

Because of improving treatments and survival, 40% to 58% of patients with bone metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will suffer from at least one skeletal-related event (SRE), affecting their quality of life, but the natural history of SRE is poorly understood. The study aimed to examine the factors involved in SRE-free survival (SRS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with NSCLC and bone metastases.

This was a retrospective study of 211 patients with bone metastasis from NSCLC and treated at the Tumor Hospital Affiliated to Harbin Medical University between January 2007 and January 2012. OS and SRS were evaluated by the Kaplan–Meier method. The factors associated with SRS and OS were examined using multivariate Cox analyses.

The 1 year OS was 55.9% and the median OS was 30 months (range, 1–98 months). Multivariate analyses showed that clinical staging at initial diagnosis (P < .001) and SRE (P = .033) were independently associated with OS, and clinical staging at initial diagnosis (P = .009), bone pain (P = .008), primary tumor radiotherapy (P < .001), and chemotherapy (P = .031) were independently associated with SRS. Stage I, II, and III patients under biphosphonate therapy fared better than those without biphosphonate treatment, but there was no difference for stage IV patients.

The identification of factors associated with OS and SRS of patients with NSCLC and bone metastases should provide new clues for a better management of these patients.

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