Human immunodeficiency virus infection and mortality risk among lung cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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Abstract

Background:

Previous studies have suggested that patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at higher risk of lung cancer, but the impact of HIV infection on the risk of mortality among lung cancer patients is still unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association between HIV infection and mortality risk among lung cancer patients.

Methods:

PubMed and Embase databases were searched to identify studies assessing the association between HIV infection and mortality risk among lung cancer patients. Only studies reporting adjusted relative risk (RR) of mortality among lung cancer patients with HIV infection were included. Meta-analysis of random-effect model was utilized to calculate the pooled RR with 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results:

Twelve cohort studies were finally included. Compared with lung cancer patients without HIV infection, the pooled RR of mortality among lung cancer patients with HIV infection was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.22–1.78, P < .001; I2 = 88.6%). After excluding 2 studies with low quality, HIV infection was still significantly associated with an elevated risk of mortality among lung cancer patients (RR = 1.51, 95% CI, 1.25–1.82, P < .001; I2 = 89.8%). Sensitivity analysis showed that the statistical significance of the pooled RR was not changed by excluding any one study.

Conclusion:

The outcomes from the meta-analysis provide strong evidence for the elevated risk of mortality among lung cancer patients with HIV infection, and HIV infection is an important prognostic factor in lung cancer patients.

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