Low serum prealbumin levels on admission can independently predict in-hospital adverse cardiac events in patients with acute coronary syndrome

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Abstract

The aim of this study is to evaluate if low prealbumin levels on admission predict subsequent adverse cardiac events in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

We designed a cohort study and enrolled 610 consecutive patients with ACS from whom venous blood for serum prealbumin measurement was drawn immediately upon hospital admission. Patients were classified in two groups according to prealbumin level: “normal” prealbumin levels (≥17 mg/dL, n=413) and “low” prealbumin (<17 mg/dL, n = 197). In-hospital adverse cardiac events were death, acute heart failure, reinfarction, and cardiogenic shock. Univariate and multivariable analyses were applied to evaluate the prediction value of low prealbumin.

The incidence of in hospital adverse cardiac events is 10.8%. The proportion of adverse cardiac events was significantly higher in low prealbumin group as compared with normal prealbumin group (20.8% versus 6.1%, P < .001). Univariate analysis indicates that low prealbumin levels can predict in hospital adverse cardiac events (odds ratio [OR]: 0.834, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.785–0.886, P < .001). Multivariable analysis shows that low prealbumin level was an independent predictor for in hospital adverse cardiac events (adjusted OR: 0.918, 95% CI: 0.848–0.993, P = .033). Other independent predictors were lower in average hemoglobin level and Killip class II-IV on admission.

Therefore, lower serum prealbumin levels on admission can independently predicts subsequent in hospital major adverse cardiac events in patients with ACS.

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