Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein as a predictor of prognosis in postoperative cardiac surgery patients

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Abstract

During the perioperative period of cardiac disease, as many risk factors exist, such as primary cardiac diseases, the use of vasopressors, ischemia-reperfusion injury during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and surgical stress, the gut suffered from ischemia, anoxia and oxidative stress, which would lead to the enterocyte injury. The aim of this study was to explore whether serum intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (IFABP), which is excreted specifically from damaged intestinal enterocytes, as a predictor of prognosis in postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

From January 2017 to December 2017, 40 postoperative cardiac surgery patients were enrolled in this observational study. Serum IFABP levels and prognostic biomarkers were recorded at intensive care unit (ICU) admission.

The serum IFABP levels were significantly higher in postoperative cardiac surgery patients who complicated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (median, 883.20 pg/mL vs 426.10 pg/mL; P < .001), infective complications (median, 917.70 pg/mL vs 409.40 pg/mL; P < .001), or who stayed in ICU beyond 4 days (median, 807.65 pg/mL vs 426.10 pg/mL; P < .001). Moreover, in patients who suffered from right ventricular dysfunction, the serum IFABP levels were significantly higher (median, 737.85 pg/mL vs 445.55 pg/mL; P = .016). The serum IFABP levels also showed great precision for the prediction of MODS (the area under curve, AUC 0.923), infective complications (AUC 0.961) and ICU stay beyond 4 days (AUC 0.853). And it correlated significantly with the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score (P < .05), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score (P < .05), and acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI) grade (P < .001).

The serum IFABP level at ICU admission is a valuable, convenient, and objective early predictor of prognosis in postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

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