Percutaneous nerve electrical stimulation for fatigue caused by chemotherapy for cervical cancer

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Abstract

This retrospective study investigated the effectiveness of percutaneous nerve electrical stimulation (PNES) for fatigue caused by chemotherapy for cervical cancer survivors.

Totally, 83 cases of fatigue caused by chemotherapy for cervical cancer survivors were analyzed. All these cases were assigned to a treatment group (n = 43), and a control group (n = 40). Patients in the treatment group received PNES, while the subjects in the control group were on waiting list. The treatment was applied once daily for a total of 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was fatigue. It was evaluated by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), and Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ). The secondary endpoints consisted of anxiety and depression. They were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All outcomes were measured before and after 6-week treatment.

After treatment, PNES did not show significant difference in fatigue relief, measured by MFI (General fatigue, P = .31; Physical fatigue, P = .44; Activity, P = .36; Motivation, P = .55; Mental fatigue, P = .49), and FQ (Mental fatigue, P = .29; Physical fatigue, P = .35); and the reduction of anxiety and depression, measured by the HADS (Anxiety, P = .21; Depression, P = .17) after 6 weeks treatment between 2 groups.

This study demonstrated that PNES may not benefit for cervical cancer survivors with fatigue caused by chemotherapy after 6-week treatment.

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