Pancreatectomy for a secondary metastasis to the pancreas: A single-institution experience

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes of secondary metastasis to the pancreas in terms of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) after pancreatectomy.

This retrospective study included 29 patients who underwent pancreatectomy for secondary metastasis to the pancreas between December 1995 and August 2016.

The study group was divided into renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (17 patients) and non-RCC (12 patients). The non-RCC group had 5 cases of colorectal cancer and 7 of another primary origin. The OS for the whole cohort was 86.2% at 1 year, 63.2% at 3 years, and 46.7% at 5 years. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups at 1, 3, and 5 years survival and OS. In subgroup analysis of patients who underwent curative resection, there was no significant difference in OS between the 2 groups at 1, 3, and 5 years. However, there was a significant difference in recurrence rate at 3 years (P = .035). Pathologic analysis showed that the non-RCC group had significantly more positive lymph node metastasis than the RCC group (P = .002).

Pancreatectomy for secondary metastasis has promising short- and long-term outcomes in terms of OS and DFS.

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