SLCO1B1 genetic variation and hormone therapy in menopausal women

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Abstract

Objective:

Response to menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) shows individual variation. SLCO1B1 encodes the OATP1B1 transporter expressed in the liver that transports many endogenous substances, including estrone sulfate, from the blood into hepatocytes. This study evaluated the relationship between genetic variation in SLCO1B1 and response to MHT in women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Methods:

KEEPS participants were randomized to oral conjugated equine estrogen (n = 33, oCEE), transdermal 17β-estradiol (n = 33, tE2), or placebo (n = 34) for 48 months. Menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, palpitations) were self-reported before treatment and at 48 months. Estrone (E1), E2, and sulfated conjugates (E1S, E2S) were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (c.521T>C, p.Val174Ala) was genotyped using a TaqMan assay.

Results:

After adjusting for treatment, there was a significant association between the SLCO1B1 rs4149056 TT genotype (encoding normal function transporter) and lower E1S, E1S/E1, and E2S (P = 0.032, 0.010, and 0.008, respectively) compared with women who were heterozygous (TC) or homozygous (CC) for the reduced function allele. The interactions between genotype, treatment, and E2S concentration were stronger in women assigned to tE2 (P = 0.013) than the women taking oCEE (P = 0.056). Among women assigned to active treatment, women with the CT genotype showed a significantly greater decrease in night sweats (P = 0.041) than those with the TT genotype.

Conclusions:

Individual variation in sulfated estrogens is explained, in part, by genetic variation in SLCO1B1. Bioavailability of sulfated estrogens may contribute to relief of night sweats.

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