Effects of stair-climbing vs run training on treadmill and track running performance

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Physically active college age women were evaluated to determine the effects of 9 wk of stair-climbing (Stairmaster Gauntlet) vs run training on 2414-m run time and treadmill measured aerobic capacity (JOURNAL/mespex/04.02/00005768-199311000-00012/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T222401Z/r/image-pngO2max) and submaximal physiological parameters. Subjects were randomly assigned to a stair-climbing (STAIR N = 11) (43.8 ± 1.5 ml·kg-1 ·min-1) (mean ± SEM) or run training (RUN N = 12) (44.2 ± 1.8) group, training 4 d·wk-1 at 70–80% of maximum heart rate (MHR) for 30 min progressing to 85–90% MHR for 45 min. The STAIR group significantly increased (P < 0.01) their JOURNAL/mespex/04.02/00005768-199311000-00012/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T222401Z/r/image-pngO2max by 12% and decreased (P < 0.01) their 2414-m run time of 12.8 min by 8%. The RUN group increased (P < 0.01) their JOURNAL/mespex/04.02/00005768-199311000-00012/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T222401Z/r/image-pngO2max 16% and decreased run time (P < 0.01) 11 % from 13.1 min. Submaximal treadmill runs at the same speed and grade demonstrated significant decreases in %JOURNAL/mespex/04.02/00005768-199311000-00012/ENTITY_OV0312/v/2017-07-20T222401Z/r/image-pngO2max and %MHR (P < 0.01) for both groups. The data support the use of stair-climbing exercise as an alternative mode to running with similar treadmill and running performance results subsequent to 9 wk of training.

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