NERVE ULTRASOUND IN MILLER FISHER VARIANT OF GUILLAIN–BARRé SYNDROME

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Introduction:

Focal enlargement of the peripheral and spinal nerves, visualized using high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS), has been reported in early Guillain–Barré syndrome, but not in the Miller Fisher variant. We report the use of HRUS in 2 patients who presented with acute ataxic neuropathy, areflexia, and ophthalmoparesis.

Methods:

Ultrasound and/or nerve conduction studies (NCS) of peripheral nerves, the vagus, and spinal nerves C5/6 were performed at onset and 2 weeks after immunoglobulin therapy.

Results:

Both patients fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS). Laboratory findings revealed elevated ganglioside Q1b antibodies in both and an albuminolocytologic dissociation in 1 patient. In addition, 1 patient had NCS evidence for demyelinating neuropathy. However, ultrasound showed focal enlargement in the vagus, the spinal nerves, and/or in the peripheral nerves in both patients. After therapy, nerve enlargement decreased in parallel with clinical improvement.

Conclusion:

Spinal and/or peripheral nerve enlargement supports the diagnosis of MFS in early phases of the disease. Muscle Nerve52: 1106–1110, 2015

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles