Defects in dendrite and spine maturation and synaptogenesis associated with an anxious-depressive-like phenotype of GABAA receptor-deficient mice

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Mice that were rendered heterozygous for the γ2 subunit of GABAA receptors (γ2+/− mice) have been characterized extensively as a model for major depressive disorder. The phenotype of these mice includes behavior indicative of heightened anxiety, despair, and anhedonia, as well as defects in hippocampus-dependent pattern separation, HPA axis hyperactivity and increased responsiveness to antidepressant drugs. The γ2+/− model thereby provides strong support for the GABAergic deficit hypothesis of major depressive disorder. Here we show that γ2+/− mice additionally exhibit specific defects in late stage survival of adult-born hippocampal granule cells, including reduced complexity of dendritic arbors and impaired maturation of synaptic spines. Moreover, cortical γ2+/− neurons cultured in vitro show marked deficits in GABAergic innervation selectively when grown under competitive conditions that may mimic the environment of adult-born hippocampal granule cells. Finally, brain extracts of γ2+/− mice show a numerical but insignificant trend (p = 0.06) for transiently reduced expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at three weeks of age, which might contribute to the previously reported developmental origin of the behavioral phenotype of γ2+/− mice. The data indicate increasing congruence of the GABAergic, glutamatergic, stress-based and neurotrophic deficit hypotheses of major depressive disorder.

This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘GABAergic Signaling in Health and Disease’.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles