Probiotics and prebiotic fiber for constipation associated with Parkinson disease: An RCT

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Abstract

Objectives:

Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics and prebiotics in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and constipation.

Methods:

We conducted a tertiary setting, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with PD with Rome III–confirmed constipation based on 2-week stool diary data at baseline. Patients (n = 120) were randomly assigned (2:1) to either a fermented milk, containing multiple probiotic strains and prebiotic fiber, or placebo, once daily for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the increase in the number of complete bowel movements (CBMs) per week. The key secondary endpoints were 3 or more CBMs and an increase by one or more CBMs per week during weeks 3 and 4.

Results:

For the primary endpoint, the consumption of a fermented milk containing probiotics and prebiotics resulted in a higher increase in the number of CBMs (mean 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8–1.6) than placebo (0.1, 95% CI −0.4% to 0.6%) (mean difference 1.1, 95% CI 0.4–1.8; p = 0.002). For the key secondary endpoints, a higher number of patients in the probiotics–prebiotics group vs the placebo group reported 3 or more CBMs (p = 0.030; 58.8% vs 37.5%; odds ratio = 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.2) and an increase by one or more CBMs (p = 0.004; 53.8% vs 25.0%; odds ratio = 3.5, 95% CI 1.8–8.1) during weeks 3 and 4.

Conclusions:

The consumption of a fermented milk containing multiple probiotic strains and prebiotic fiber was superior to placebo in improving constipation in patients with PD.

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier:

NCT02459717.

Classification of evidence:

This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with PD who have constipation, fermented milk containing probiotics and prebiotics increases the frequency of CBMs.

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