High frequency stimulation of the entopeduncular nucleus has no effect on striatal dopaminergic transmission


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Abstract

High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is thought to be superior to stimulation of the internal pallidum (GPi) in alleviating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, preliminary controlled studies comparing the effectiveness of both targets have not found significant differences in the improvement of parkinsonian symptoms, but have shown that STN stimulation allows a dramatic decrease in dopaminergic medication. We have previously shown that STN-HFS increases striatal extracellular dopamine (DA) metabolites, but not DA, in both naive and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, whereas stimulation of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rodent equivalent of the internal pallidum, does not affect DA or metabolite levels. Intriguingly, STN-HFS increases striatal DA release after inhibition of DA reuptake or metabolism, suggesting that this observation may have been obscured in non-drug treated animals by rapid and effective DA reuptake. Since STN-HFS further enhances DA metabolism after DA reuptake inhibition or depletion it has been proposed that STN-HFS increases both, striatal DA release and metabolism, independently. Therefore, the present study assesses the impact of EP-HFS on striatal DA release and metabolism in normal rats after inhibition of DA reuptake or metabolism, using microdialysis. In summary, our data demonstrate that, contrary to STN stimulation, EP-HFS has no effect on striatal DA release and metabolism. Thus, the present study provides a partial explanation for the reported clinical differences, and experimental evidence for differential mechanisms of action between HFS of the internal pallidum and the STN, that are most likely related to differences in functional anatomy.

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