Results of Linear Accelerator-based Radiosurgery for Intracranial Meningiomas

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We report the outcomes of patients treated with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas at our institution.

METHODS:

We reviewed 127 patients with 155 meningiomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at the study institutions between October 1988 and December 1995.

RESULTS:

There were 86 female and 41 male patients (median age, 61.5 yr; range, 19.9-87.9 yr). The median follow-up period was 31 months (range, 1.2-79.8 mo). The median tumor volume was 4.1 cc (range, 0.16-51.2 cc), and the median marginal dose was 15 Gy (range, 9-20 Gy). The tumor locations were as follows: convexity, 31 tumors; parasagittal/falcine, 39 tumors; cranial base, 82 tumors; and ventricular/pineal, 3 tumors. There were 106 benign, 26 atypical, and 18 malignant meningiomas and 5 cases of meningiomatosis. SRS was performed on 48 lesions as the initial treatment and on 107 lesions as adjunct therapy. Freedom from progression was observed in 107 patients (84.3%) at a median time of 22.9 months (range, 1.2-79.8 mo). Twenty patients (15.7%) had disease progression (16 marginal [12.6%] and 4 local [3.1%]) at a median time of 19.6 months (range, 4.1-69.3 mo); the median time for freedom from progression for the benign, atypical, and malignant meningiomas was 20.9, 24.4, and 13.9 months, respectively. Actuarial tumor control for the patients with benign meningiomas was 100, 92.9, 89.3, and 89.3% at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years, respectively. Six patients(4.7%) had permanent complications attributable to SRS (median time, 10.3 mo; range, 4.3-18.0 mo); 13 patients died as a result of causes related to the meningiomas (median, 17.5 mo; range, 4.3-37.3 mo). The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival probability for the entire group of patients was 90.3, 82.6, 73.6, 70.5, and 68.2%, respectively; for patients with benign meningiomas, excluding death resulting from intercurrent disease, the survival probability was 97.6, 94.8, 91.0, 91.0, and 91.0%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year survival probability for the patients with atypical and malignant meningiomas was 91.7, 83.3, 83.3, and 83.3% and 92.3, 64.6, 43.1, and 21.5%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Even though complications from SRS are expected more frequently with large tumors near critical structures, SRS is a safe and effective means of treating selected meningiomas.

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