Job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions of newly graduated nurses


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Abstract

Job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions of newly graduated nursesAimTo describe new graduate nurses’ worklife experiences in Ontario hospital settings in the first 2 years of practice and to examine predictors of job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions.BackgroundWith a large cohort of nurses approaching retirement, every effort must be made to ensure that the work environments of new graduate nurses are positive, promoting job satisfaction and commitment to the profession to address the nursing workforce shortage.MethodA cross-sectional analysis of data from a mail survey of new graduate nurses (n = 342) in their first and second year of experience was used to address the research objectives.ResultsOverall, new graduate nurses were positive about their working conditions and there were few differences between nurses in their first and second years of practice. Structural and personal factors explained significant amounts of variance (31–68%) in both job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions. Empowerment, work engagement and burnout were important significant predictors.ConclusionsModifiable workplace factors play an important role in influencing new graduates’ job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions.Implications for nursing management|Managers can employ strategies to enhance quality work environments that promote retention of new graduates and lessen the nursing workforce shortage.

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