Job satisfaction among Iranian hospital-based practicing nurses: examining the influence of self-expectation, social interaction and organisational situations


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Abstract

Job satisfaction among Iranian hospital-based practicing nurses: examining the influence of self-expectation, social interaction, and organisational situationsAimThe influence of self-expectation, social interaction, and organisational situation on job satisfaction among nurses is examined.BackgroundUnderstanding determinants and correlates of job satisfaction are important factors that help to reduce the problem of nurse attrition.MethodsUtilizing the Hybrid Model of concept development, job satisfaction was examined in three phases: (1) the theoretical phase, a working definition and the dimensions of job satisfaction were established; (2) the fieldwork phase, a qualitative semi-structured interview was employed to capture participants’ perceptions of the concept; and (3) the analytical phase, the experiences of nurses were evaluated using the conceptual model.ResultsThe results indicate that personal beliefs, rather than social interaction or organisational situation, constitute the core of job satisfaction.ConclusionsDespite the variety of dissatisfaction factors rooted in social interaction and organisational situation, participants achieved the highest job satisfaction when trusting in self-value systems and the spiritual value of their job objectives.ImplicationsIntervention is needed to increase organisational and professional support for nurses. However, highlighting the sacred and spiritual value of the nursing profession, which is rooted in religious values and culture, provides additional reinforcement for enhancing the job satisfaction among this segment of health care providers.

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