Umbilical Cord Plasma Glutathione S-Transferase Alpha 1-1 Levels as a Marker of Neonatal Hepatocellular Integrity

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Abstract

Objective

To investigate possible delivery-related impaired neonatal hepatocellular integrity by assessment of arterial and venous umbilical cord plasma levels of glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1.

Methods

Glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 levels were assessed in arterial and venous umbilical cord, and maternal venous plasma samples. The influence of maternal, delivery, and neonatal characteristics on arterial umbilical cord glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 levels was studied, using linear regression analysis after log-transformation.

Results

Median (range) arterial umbilical cord glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 plasma levels were higher than venous umbilical cord levels (9.68 [0.64–1125] μg/L and 7.66 [0.78–987.5] μg/L, respectively, P < .005). Median (range) arterial and venous umbilical cord glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 levels were higher than, and did not correlate with, maternal venous plasma levels (8.79 [1.79–183] μg/L and 6.47 [1.58–164.5] μg/L versus 1.47 [0.46–10.4] μg/L, P < .001). Neonates born vaginally demonstrated higher median (range) levels than those delivered by cesarean (13.41 [1.02–1125] μg/L and 5.73 [0.64–172.90] μg/L, respectively, P < .001). Neonates with unfavorable pH (arterial pH under 7.20) demonstrated higher median (range) levels than those with normal pH (arterial pH at least 7.20) (15.15 [0.77–1125] μg/L and 8.82 [0.64–120.90] μg/L, respectively, P < .001). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that birth weight had the largest influence on arterial umbilical cord glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 levels, followed by arterial base deficit, and route of delivery.

Conclusion

Arterial umbilical cord glutathione S-transferase Alpha 1-1 plasma levels, being unrelated to maternal venous levels, might give a reliable impression of early neonatal hepatocellular integrity and may become an additional indicator of neonatal condition immediately after birth.

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