ACOG Committee Opinion No. 732 Summary: Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy


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Abstract

Influenza vaccination is an essential element of prepregnancy, prenatal, and postpartum care because influenza can result in serious illness, including a higher chance of progressing to pneumonia, when it occurs during the antepartum or postpartum period. In addition to hospitalization, pregnant women with influenza are at increased risk of intensive care unit admission and adverse perinatal and neonatal outcomes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that all adults receive an annual influenza vaccine and that women who are or will be pregnant during influenza season receive an inactivated influenza vaccine as soon as it is available. In the United States, the influenza season typically occurs from October to May. Ideally, an influenza vaccination should be given before the end of October, but vaccination throughout the influenza season is encouraged to ensure protection during the period of circulation. Any of the licensed, recommended, age-appropriate, inactivated influenza vaccines can be given safely during any trimester. Therefore, it is critically important that obstetrician–gynecologists and other obstetric care providers recommend and advocate for the influenza vaccine. Obstetrician–gynecologists are encouraged to stock and administer the influenza vaccine to their pregnant patients in their offices, and should get the influenza vaccine themselves every season. If the influenza vaccine cannot be offered in a practice, obstetrician–gynecologists and obstetric care providers should refer patients to another health care provider, pharmacy, or community vaccination center. This updated Committee Opinion includes more recent data on the safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination during pregnancy and recommendations for treatment and postexposure chemoprophylaxis.

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