Teaching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, and Queer Family Building in a Third Year OBGYN Clerkship

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Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore third year medical students' fund of knowledge and attitudes about LGBTQ family building and third party reproduction.

BACKGROUND:

Medical student knowledge and attitudes about family building for LGBTQ families and third party reproduction (TPR) varies based on student prior experience and pre-clinical teaching. The OBGYN clerkship is a unique opportunity for students to learn medical knowledge and reflect on attitudes about this subject.

METHODS:

A quantitative study of knowledge and attitude among third year medical students done after IRB approval. The intervention consisted of a one hour lecture on TPR and participating in a group discussion about LGBTQ family building. Students (231) completed a survey asking about their knowledge and attitudes prior to starting the rotation and 178 completed the survey following the intervention. Survey respondents rated items using a Likert scale and completed a knowledge assessment. Changes in knowledge scores were investigated using t-tests.

RESULTS:

Survey respondents were 51% female, 48% male, 1% gender non-conforming; heterosexual 93%; and partnered 59%. Comfort with same sex couples was endorsed by 92%. 56% of students felt that opting out of assisting a patient with family building was not an option. Fertility knowledge increased from after intervention significantly (P<.0001). Some students, 29%, thought that infertility was hard to discuss, but 67% felt it would be hard to discuss for same sex couples.

DISCUSSION:

Medical students' fund of knowledge was increased with lecture and small group discussion about TPR and LGBTQ patients. Students report being comfortable with TPR and LGBTQ families but have some discomfort with varied pathways to parenthood. Most feel that opting out of care for LGBTQ families is not an option.

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