0145 Effects of perceived job insecurity on depression, suicide ideation, and decline in self-rated health in korea: a population-based panel study

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Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the effects of job security on new-onset depression, suicide ideation, and decline in self-rated health.

Methods

We analysed data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study from 2012 to 2015. Participants were 2552 waged workers. Depression, suicide ideation, and health were assessed by self-reported questionnaires on an annual basis. We classified the participants into high job security group, intermediate job security group, and low job security group. To evaluate the influence of job security on outcomes, we performed survival analysis after stratification by gender with adjustment for covariates. The result was stratified by gender and based on whether the respondent was the head of the house or not.

Results

After adjusting for covariates in men, the hazard ratios (HRs) were significantly higher among low job security group for depression (HR 1.52), suicide ideation (HR 4.00), and decline in self-rated health (HR 1.83). In women, the HR of depression was significantly higher for the intermediate job security group (HR 1.62). For men with low job security who were the head of the house, the HR of depression, suicide ideation, and decline in self-rated health was significantly higher. Besides, those with intermediate job security had an increased risk of decline in self-rated health. In women with intermediate and low job security, the risk of depression was higher when they were the head of the house.

Conclusions

We found that perceived job insecurity is associated with the onset of depression, suicide ideation, and decline in self-rated health.

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