0430 Female workers suffered higher psychological symptoms after occupational injuries than male workers

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Abstract

Introduction

This study aimed to examine the prevalence rates of psychological symptoms and risk factors between female and male workers at 12 months after their sustaining occupational injurie. Demographic and injury-related risk factors for psychological symptoms were evaluated.

Methods

Our study candidates were injured workers in Taiwan who were hospitalised for 3 days or longer and received hospitalisation benefits from the Labour Insurance program. A self-reported questionnaire including the Brief Symptom Rating Scale was sent to workers at 12 months after injury.

Results

A total of 1233 workers (response rate 28.0%) completed the questionnaire, including 356 women and 877 men. A higher percentage (30.1%) of women had elevated BSRS-5 score of 6 or higher than men (22.5%). The risk factors for elevated psychological symptom scores for female workers were lower education level (odds ratio, OR=1.8, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.1–3.0), main income contributor of the household (OR=1.8, CI=1.1–3.0), severely affected physical appearance due to injury (OR=2.8, CI=1.3–5.9), and having adverse life event after injury (OR=2.0, CI=1.1–3.6) after mutual adjustment. Whereas the risk factors for elevated psychological symptom scores for female workers were loss of consciousness after the injury (OR=2.0, CI=1.3–3.1), severely affected physical appearance due to injury (OR=3.7, CI=2.3–6.0), having adverse life event after injury (OR=2.5, CI=1.6–3.8), not return-to-work (OR=3.2, CI=2.0–5.1), and reduced salary as compared to that before injury (OR=2.4, CI=1.3–4.1).

Conclusions

After occupational injury, women suffered from higher rate of psychological symptoms. Risk factors were different between men and women who sustained occupational injuries.

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