1682b The use of video and content to promote and disseminate science

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Abstract

Introduction

Audio-visual content is rapidly becoming the preferred form of content in user-controlled-media, aka social media. We see media going from classical journalist provided content to more positioned or assigned content and more video and audio-visual content. This goes for both online and offline streaming. Simultaneously we do see an establishment of (miniature) TV-channels.

Introduction

Both classical media and the major providers of social media platforms such as Facebook, Google and others are setting up their platforms in order to provide better possibilities for moving this type of content. It even scores high in search engine optimisation. Facebook is even working on becoming a TV-Channel itself – and not merely a social media platform and news provider, and thus pushing the next step in the use of assigned audio-visual content.

Methods

Today the development of technology and the economization of technology make the move more accessible for all. We can all be photographers and video-makers, sound engineers and film directors or visual effects makers. We can all assign content and move it faster with video.

Methods

Still science in its dissemination is rather textual and video seem to be controlled by representatives of the 70 s educational programmes and their University-equivalent in the 2000s.

Methods

Why should OSH providers reach into this development, make use of it and gain from it? How should we do it, and what hindrances can we meet? What are the concerns to look out for and how can a small scientific organisation benefit from this development?

Results

What lessons can we learn from content marketing and the use of more audio-visual tools in the dissemination of science? What have we experienced so far and to what extent this evolve into models usable outside of the mere personal or organisational experience?

Conclusions

This move of communication, both in form and use of platforms, is ongoing, and scientific OSH-organisations are not forerunners within this field. Therefor collation and sharing of practice and experience is highly needed across the OSH-arena. Improved understanding of why, improved competence on how-to combined with higher levels of activity will provide OSH with a larger catchment area and probably higher societal impact.

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